Some Pre-NaNoWriMo Inspiration

Need some help finding that right writerly inspiration? Check out these magazines and journals for some cool fiction, nonfiction, and refreshing brain-slaps:

 

Orion (especially check out their “7 Ways to Write to the Future” article)

The first issue of the Orion Nature Quarterly was published in June 1982, and in its editorial George Russell, the publication’s first Editor-in-Chief, boldly stated Orion’s values:

“It is Orion’s fundamental conviction that humans are morally responsible for the world in which we live, and that the individual comes to sense this responsibility as he or she develops a personal bond with nature.”

Orion’s mission today is to inform, inspire, and engage individuals and grassroots organizations in becoming a significant cultural force for healing nature and community.

Ms. 

Ms. was the first national magazine to make feminist voices audible, feminist journalism tenable, and a feminist worldview available to the public.

Today, the magazine remains an interactive enterprise in which an unusually diverse readership is simultaneously engaged with each other and the world. The modern Ms. boasts the most extensive coverage of international women’s issues of any magazine available in the United States.

And the magazine’s time-honored traditions-an emphasis on in-depth investigative reporting and feminist political analysis, the Ms. Women of the Year Awards, and the renowned “No Comment” section-have been supplemented with discussion of such subjects as environmental feminism, women’s work styles, and the politics of emerging technologies, bringing a new generation of writers and readers together to create the feminism of the future.

Cemetery Dance 

Cemetery Dance has won every major genre award and is healthier than ever — with a higher newsstand and subscriber circulation than ever before, ever-increasing advertiser support, and a continuing reputation for superb content and design. We’re well-known for publishing the biggest and the brightest stars in the [horror] genre, often before they’re discovered by the big New York publishers.

Analog Science Fiction and Fact

Astounding/Analog (often all-encompassingly just called ASF) is often considered the magazine where science fiction grew up. When editor John W. Campbell took over in 1938, he brought to Astounding an unprecedented insistence on placing equal emphasis on both words of “science fiction.” No longer satisfied with gadgetry and action per se, Campbell demanded that his writers try to think out how science and technology might really develop in the future-and, most importantly, how those changes would affect the lives of human beings. The new sophistication soon made Astounding the undisputed leader in the field, and Campbell began to think the old title was too “sensational” to reflect what the magazine was actually doing. He chose “Analog” in part because he thought of each story as an “analog simulation” of a possible future, and in part because of the close analogy he saw between the imagined science in the stories he was publishing and the real science being done in laboratories around the world.

Real science and technology have always been important in ASF, not only as the foundation of its fiction, but as the subject of articles about real research with big implications for the future. One story published during World War II described an atomic bomb so accurately-before Hiroshima-that FBI agents visited John Campbell to find out where the leak was. (There was no leak-just attentive, forward-thinking writers!) More recently, many readers first encountered the startling potentials of nanotechnology in these pages, in both fact articles (including one by nanotech pioneer K. Eric Drexler) and fiction.

Mental Floss

For the record: mental_floss magazine is an intelligent read, but not too intelligent. We’re the sort of intelligent that you hang out with for a while, enjoy our company, laugh a little, smile a lot and then we part ways. Great times. And you only realize how much you learned from us after a little while. Like a couple days later when you’re impressing your friends with all these intriguing facts and things you picked up from us, and they ask you how you know so much, and you think back on that great afternoon you spent with us and you smile.

And then you lie and say you read a lot.

The Baltimore Review

The mission of The Baltimore Review is to showcase Baltimore as a literary hub of diverse writing and promote the work of emerging and established writers.

Nature

Nature is a weekly international journal publishing the finest peer-reviewed research in all fields of science and technology on the basis of its originality, importance, interdisciplinary interest, timeliness, accessibility, elegance and surprising conclusions. Nature also provides rapid, authoritative, insightful and arresting news and interpretation of topical and coming trends affecting science, scientists and the wider public.

Nature’s Mission Statement

First, to serve scientists through prompt publication of significant advances in any branch of science, and to provide a forum for the reporting and discussion of news and issues concerning science. Second, to ensure that the results of science are rapidly disseminated to the public throughout the world, in a fashion that conveys their significance for knowledge, culture and daily life.

 

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4 thoughts on “Some Pre-NaNoWriMo Inspiration”

  1. Hey! So, because I think your blog is awesome, I’ve nominated you for a Leibster Award! I did a post about the whole thing earlier today, which I’ve included at the bottom for more info and details and all that jazz about it, but just know that there are absolutely no strings attached and you can accept or not accept if you want. It’s just a nice little way of expressing my appreciation as a reader for your blog 🙂

    http://thebewildered20somethingwriter.wordpress.com/2013/10/15/100th-post-the-liebster-award/

    1. Why, thank you very much! I’m extremely flattered and so glad to know that you enjoy my blog (I certainly enjoy yours as well!). I would be thrilled to accept this nomination (although my blog has already been nominated once, not only did the award look different, but I was not able to accept it then because the nominator specified that my blog had to have fewer than 200 followers).

      Thanks again, Bewildered 20 Something!

      1. Yay! Well, I’m glad you can accept it this time, because that specification is just plain silly in my humble opinion 😛

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